Parasports: going beyond limitations

Until Roger Bannister ran a mile under a minute in 1954, it was thought impossible for humans to run that fast. Today most international runners can meet the target. If sport is about overcoming limitations, para athletes are some of the greatest mindbenders: for instance, how does a knee amputee play badminton, or a visually…

The Booksellers of Bangalore – 2

Back again with more haunts for those of you who get high on the scent of books: 1. Goobe’s Book Republic: A short walk down from K.C. Das Sweets on Church Street, you can spot an intriguing sign on the pavement: Haha. Cracks me up everytime. Goobe’s is cool: a funky little store in the basement, with quotes on…

Kashmir floods: reporting without bias

I work for a national daily. It’s a hard thing to admit to when you’re in the midst of something as sudden and shocking as a natural calamity, because there is a truth few reporters will say aloud: journalists thrive on tragedies. But when the tragedy becomes personal, when for days there is no news…

To poetry and all things sublime

Our poetry is the last dreamy song sung in haste by a head on the rails listening to the rumble of the approaching train before the steel crushes its thought. – Farewell, by K. Satchidanandan

Child abuse: Starting a conversation

We got cable TV when I was around nine. Suddenly, SONY and StarPlus were being aired right to our homes, and with that, the 4 to 6 p.m. slot was booked for a bunch of American sit-coms from the ’80s: Small Wonder, Bewitched, Silver Spoons and Diff’rent Strokes. Even if the story line was flimsy…

The Booksellers of Brigade Road

Bangalore is no Dilli when it comes to old books. You don’t find hawkers selling yellowed paperbacks outside every gully and metro station. (Which is hardly a big deal, considering techno-wallon ka sheher has exactly six stations at the moment. :P) You’d be hard put to find something like the Daryaganj Sunday Book market here….

The “other” Nobel Prize contender

The Indian press heaved a collective sigh of regret when Malala Yousafzai did not win the Nobel Prize for Peace. Every newspaper and TV channel loves a good story, and Malala’s offered everything. A courageous girl ready to fight to death for her right to education, and a chance to gloat over Pakistan’s abysmal human…

Why do we blog?

Ok, so ten thousand people on the big bad Internet have answered this question, in words more eloquent than I can ever churn. But I need to answer, because in this case, the only answer that matters to me is mine. I blog because I love words, and fancy myself as a bit of a…

BLF-2013: A balmy afternoon and some book-time

Why do people visit lit fests? That was the question in my head as I stepped into the spacious lawns at Crowne Plaza, where the Bangalore Literature Festival 2013 was on in full swing. I walked into Mysore Park (Stage 1) in time to hear the moderator accusing William Dalrymple of being elitist. (Wonder how that…

The Indian Chural Road

There used to be a large white signboard in the manufacturing plant where I worked a few years ago. It stood right outside the R & D Centre, and proudly read: INDIAN CHURAL ROAD. No one knew what it was doing in the company. It just existed, by some weird quirk of fate, an amusing…

House hunting and the secularist sham

I have two Kashmiri brothers. I wonder how my neighbours will react if I tell them this. Will they look at me with narrowed eyes? Will every broker I call looking for an apartment make eager offers until the moment he hears my name? Then suddenly all the flats get booked; the house we had agreed…

My Body My Weapon

Kavita Joshi’s documentary ‘My Body My Weapon’ (2007) on Irom Sharmila’s relentless struggle for repealing the Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act, 1958. Ms. Sharmila is currently in the thirteenth year of her fast. (Source: http://kavitajoshi.blogspot.in)